Housing / Homeless Services

    Results: 25

  • Community Shelters (2)
    BH-1800.8500-150

    Community Shelters

    BH-1800.8500-150

    Programs, usually sponsored by community organizations or coalitions, that provide temporary shelter for homeless people, generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy. Most community shelters offer support services which may include counseling, advocacy, referrals and help with future plans; and enforce house rules including curfews and mandatory household chores. Participation in religious activities is either optional or not a part of the program. There may be differences in intake, length of stay and amenities in family oriented facilities and those that target other specific populations.
  • Crisis Shelter (2)
    BH-1800.1500

    Crisis Shelter

    BH-1800.1500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay for people who are unable to return to their own homes due to sexual assault, domestic violence, human trafficking or other problems. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are in one of these situations.
  • Day Shelters (2)
    BH-1800.8500-170

    Day Shelters

    BH-1800.8500-170

    Programs that provide a temporary place for homeless people who work second or third shifts to sleep during the day until they are able to find permanent housing.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (3)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women.
  • Emergency Shelter (5)
    BH-1800

    Emergency Shelter

    BH-1800

    Programs that provide a temporary or transitional place to stay for newcomers, people who are in crisis, or homeless individuals in the community.
  • Emergency Shelter Clearinghouses (2)
    BH-1850

    Emergency Shelter Clearinghouses

    BH-1850

    Programs that coordinate requests for emergency shelter by screening homeless individuals who apply using criteria established by the shelters, maintaining lists of individuals who have been aided, and checking new applicants against the lists before referring them to a resource that can meet their needs. Emergency shelter clearinghouses help to avoid duplication of service and maximize the availability of shelter resources while relieving the agencies of the task of handling requests directly. Also included are programs that refer people needing shelter to an appropriate resource, but which are not the sole source for this information.
  • Family Crisis Shelters (15)
    BH-1800.1500-200

    Family Crisis Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-200

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for certain members of or entire families who are involved in or at risk for child abuse or neglect. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services that are related to child abuse including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Homeless Drop In Centers (8)
    BH-1800.3500

    Homeless Drop In Centers

    BH-1800.3500

    Centers where homeless people can spend time during the day or evening. Services may include counseling and/or medication monitoring on a formal or informal basis; personal hygiene supplies; facilities for showering, shaving, napping, laundering clothes, making necessary telephone calls or attending to other personal needs; and other basic supportive services. Some centers may also provide meals or facilities for cooking. Programs that focus on homeless youth may provide case management, living skills training, family reunification assistance, classes and other educational supports, pre-employment training, health education (including HIV prevention), help in obtaining valid ID and other services that help youth successfully exit street life and transition to independent living.
  • Homeless Financial Assistance Programs (1)
    NL-1000.3000

    Homeless Financial Assistance Programs

    NL-1000.3000

    Programs authorized under federal or state legislation or local government initiatives that provide financial assistance for the express purpose of obtaining temporary shelter, emergency housing or permanent housing for individuals and/or families who are homeless or imminently homeless. Expenses may include rental deposits, rent assistance, utility deposits, moving expenses, expenses associated with non-shelter temporary housing in situations where permanent housing has been secured but is currently unavailable, and other costs the family may incur in the process of acquiring or maintaining housing. Allowable activities, eligibility criteria and other requirements vary depending on the funding source.
  • Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing (1)
    BH-8400.3000

    Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.3000

    Programs that provide affordable, community-based housing for individuals and families who have experienced long-term or chronic homelessness and have been diagnosed as having a physical or developmental disability, a severe mental illness, substance abuse problems or HIV/AIDS; or are members of another designated group within the homeless population. Structures may include apartments, single-family houses, duplexes, group homes or single-room occupancy housing. Permanent supportive housing programs generally provide residents with the rights of tenancy under state or local landlord/tenant laws and are linked to services designed to meet residents' needs. Supportive services vary depending on the resident population. Most programs offer some type of case management and housing support, but may also offer more intensive mental health, substance abuse, vocational, employment or other services which help promote independent living. Supportive services may be offered on-site or off-site, or be provided by a mobile service team.
  • Homeless Shelter (36)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Housing Advocacy Groups (5)
    TD-1600.2800

    Housing Advocacy Groups

    TD-1600.2800

    Organizations that advocate for constructing, renovating or otherwise improving the availability of safe, affordable rental and purchasable housing for low-income individuals and families, older adults, people with disabilities, migrant workers and others who are unable to purchase a home or rent a home or apartment under current market conditions or who are forced to spend an excessively large proportion of their income on housing to the detriment of other necessities.
  • Housing Authorities (4)
    BH-8300.3000

    Housing Authorities

    BH-8300.3000

    City, county, or state housing offices that provide information about eligibility for and vacancies in the subsidized housing properties that are under their jurisdiction. Housing authorities accept Section 8 applications, provide Section 8 vouchers, make approved Section 8 rental payments and administer public housing communities while in certain rural areas, the housing finance agency may play this role.
  • Housing Counseling (15)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Housing Discrimination Assistance (1)
    FT-1800.3000

    Housing Discrimination Assistance

    FT-1800.3000

    Programs that provide assistance for people who believe that they have been denied an opportunity to purchase, lease or rent the home or apartment of their choice due to their age, gender, family composition, race or ethnic origin, nationality, religion, disability, sexual orientation or marital status.
  • Housing Down Payment Loans/Grants (4)
    BH-3500.3500

    Housing Down Payment Loans/Grants

    BH-3500.3500

    Programs that provide cash grants or loans for people who want to purchase or build a home and need all or a portion of the amount that is required to make a down payment on the home or property. Included are conventional loans, deferred loans (in which payments are deferred until the home is sold) and forgivable loans (in which all or a part of the loan is forgiven if the borrower resides in the home for a specified period of time).
  • Housing Expense Assistance (10)
    BH-3800

    Housing Expense Assistance

    BH-3800

    Programs that pay current housing bills or finance new living accommodations for people who are otherwise unable to provide for their housing needs. Housing expense assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Housing Search Assistance (5)
    BH-3900.3100

    Housing Search Assistance

    BH-3900.3100

    Programs that assign a staff member to assist people who are looking for housing to survey the available residences and to choose and obtain the most suitable option.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing (5)
    BH-7000.4600

    Low Income/Subsidized Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600

    Housing programs that make rental housing more readily available to homeless people and/or low-income individuals and families (those below 50% of the area's median income). Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations.
  • Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing (2)
    BH-8400.6000

    Older Adult/Disability Related Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.6000

    Residential facilities for older adults and/or people with disabilities who are unable to function in an independent living environment because they need assistance with toileting, bathing, dressing, medication management and administration, meals and housekeeping and other activities of daily living, but do not require nursing care on a regular basis. Living options range from state institutions for individuals with the most severe disabilities who require intensive services to settings that enable individuals with disabilities to live with their own families or in their own homes or apartments with supportive services from community-based supported living providers. Alternatives in between include health care facilities for people with a primary need for developmental services in combination with an intermittent need for skilled nursing care; community care facilities (residential care homes or group homes) for people who require varying levels of supervision and assistance in the activities of daily living; assisted living facilities; continuing care retirement communities; life care communities; foster family placements for adults who will benefit from interaction in a family environment; and semi-independent living facilities for individuals with disabilities who need minimal levels of support to live and work in the community. Some of these facilities are licensed by the state.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Counseling (4)
    RP-1400.8000-750

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-750

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance for children and adolescents who have run away from home and for the entire family, if appropriate, with the objective of identifying and resolving the problems that prompted the youth to leave home and/or assisting the youth to formulate and implement a workable plan for his or her immediate future.
  • Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers (3)
    BH-7000.4600-700

    Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers

    BH-7000.4600-700

    A federally-supported, tenant-based housing program administered by local housing authorities that provides assistance in the form of vouchers that enable income-eligible families to find and lease approved privately owned housing where the landlord has agreed to enter into a contract with the housing authority and/or finance agency. Tenant-based assistance provides rental subsidies that move with a household into any qualifying housing within a certain area. The housing can be (and often is) private housing that may not have been built with the intention of accepting solely low-income tenants, but if the quality and cost of the unit fall within a specified range, it may qualify. Eligible households pay approximately 30% to 40% of their adjusted gross income for rent and the housing authority subsidizes the balance.
  • Senior Housing Information and Referral (1)
    BH-8500.8000

    Senior Housing Information and Referral

    BH-8500.8000

    Programs that maintain information about retirement residences, residential care facilities and nursing homes, and link older adults who are looking for alternative living options with appropriate independent or supervised living resources.
  • Supportive Housing (2)
    BH-8400

    Supportive Housing

    BH-8400

    Programs that provide an alternative living arrangement for individuals who, because of age, disability, substance abuse, mental illness, chronic homelessness or other circumstances, are unable to live independently without care, supervision and/or support to help them in the activities of daily living; or who need access to case management, housing support, vocational, employment and other services to transition to independent living.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (32)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.