Crisis & Emergency Services

    Results: 15

  • Child Abuse Reporting/Emergency Response (1)
    PH-6500.1500-140

    Child Abuse Reporting/Emergency Response

    PH-6500.1500-140

    Programs that accept and respond to reports of child abuse or neglect. Services include assessment of the initial referral, assignment of an appropriate response time, consultation with the family to determine the nature of the problem and do initial case planning, and emergency placement services if the child is removed from the family by the police.
  • Crisis Intervention (15)
    RP-1500

    Crisis Intervention

    RP-1500

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for people who are in acute emotional distress; who are or perceive themselves to be in life-threatening situations; who are a danger to themselves or to others; or who are hysterical, frightened or otherwise unable to cope with a problem that requires immediate action. The objective of crisis intervention is to defuse the critical nature of the situation, ensure the person's safety, and return the individual to a state of equilibrium in which he or she is capable of identifying and seeking solutions to the problem.
  • Crisis Shelter (2)
    BH-1800.1500

    Crisis Shelter

    BH-1800.1500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay for people who are unable to return to their own homes due to sexual assault, domestic violence, human trafficking or other problems. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are in one of these situations.
  • Domestic Violence Hotlines (1)
    RP-1500.1400-200

    Domestic Violence Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-200

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for women and men who have experienced domestic abuse which may include steps to ensure the person's safety; short-term emotional support; assistance with shelter; legal information and advocacy; referrals for medical treatment; ongoing counseling and/or group support; and other related services. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (3)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women.
  • Emergency Food (4)
    BD-1800

    Emergency Food

    BD-1800

    Programs that provide a limited amount of food for individuals or families during times of personal crisis, or for people who have no food or cannot afford to purchase food at retail costs.
  • Emergency Medical Care (5)
    LD

    Emergency Medical Care

    LD

    Programs that provide immediate short-term assistance for accident victims and acutely ill or injured individuals who are in pain, or whose health or lives may be in jeopardy.
  • Emergency Rescue (1)
    JR-1800

    Emergency Rescue

    JR-1800

    Programs that provide emergency rescue operations and/or lifesaving activities for people who are stranded, lost, accident victims or exposed to other life threatening dangers.
  • Emergency Shelter (5)
    BH-1800

    Emergency Shelter

    BH-1800

    Programs that provide a temporary or transitional place to stay for newcomers, people who are in crisis, or homeless individuals in the community.
  • Emergency Shelter Clearinghouses (2)
    BH-1850

    Emergency Shelter Clearinghouses

    BH-1850

    Programs that coordinate requests for emergency shelter by screening homeless individuals who apply using criteria established by the shelters, maintaining lists of individuals who have been aided, and checking new applicants against the lists before referring them to a resource that can meet their needs. Emergency shelter clearinghouses help to avoid duplication of service and maximize the availability of shelter resources while relieving the agencies of the task of handling requests directly. Also included are programs that refer people needing shelter to an appropriate resource, but which are not the sole source for this information.
  • Family Crisis Shelters (15)
    BH-1800.1500-200

    Family Crisis Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-200

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for certain members of or entire families who are involved in or at risk for child abuse or neglect. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services that are related to child abuse including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Fire Services (1)
    JR-1900

    Fire Services

    JR-1900

    Programs that are responsible for preventing, investigating, controlling and extinguishing fires. Activities include fire safety education, firefighting, investigating the causes of suspicious fires, maintaining equipment and trained firefighters necessary for a quick and efficient response to fires when they occur, and enforcing fire codes which protect lives and property from fires and explosions arising from the storage, handling and use of hazardous substances, materials and devices, or from conditions hazardous to life and property in the use or occupancy of buildings or other premises.
  • Homeless Shelter (36)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Suicide Prevention Hotlines (1)
    RP-1500.1400-800

    Suicide Prevention Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-800

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for individuals who are having suicidal feelings with the objective of helping them explore alternatives to self-harm or self-destruction. Suicide prevention workers establish and maintain contact with the individual while identifying and clarifying the focal problem, evaluate the suicidal potential, assess the individual's strengths and resources, and mobilize available resources including paramedic or police intervention and emergency psychiatric care as needed. These programs can also help individuals who are worried about the potentially suicidal behavior of another with the objective of helping them identify warning signs and provide options on seeking further help. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (32)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.